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Barddas Ceridwen Creativity Druidic Virtues Druidry Druids Gwyddno Garanhir Hanes Taliesin Insight Iolo Morganwg Knowledge Learning Morality Taliesin Three Branches Wisdom

Monsters

I’ve been thinking recently about humans and our capacity for evil, provoked in part by a post by Nimue Brown: What Does It Mean to Unpeel a Monster?

There are, perhaps, two kinds of evil people. There are those who are driven by their animal nature; this is the evil caused by lust, anger, desire, and the like. Then there are those whose higher nature has become corrupt. They have come to believe that they know how to make the world perfect. Unfortunately, this usually means eliminating those of their fellow humans – and elements of nature – who fail to be perfect.

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Arianrhod Blodeuwedd Ceridwen Fourth Branch Gwydion Lleu Llaw Gyffes Plant Dôn The Mabinogion Uncategorized

Blodeuwedd

Created fully formed,
Fair of face,
Like a flower, they said.
Created with a pleasing figure,
And tawny hair,
And skin that smelled of blossom.

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Annwn Gwyddno Garanhir Gwyn ap Nudd Tylwyth Teg

Gwyn ap Nudd: horror has a face

And [Gwyn] captured Pen son of Nethog, and Nwython, and Cyledr Wyllt his son, and he killed Nwython, and forced Cyledr to eat his father’s heart, and because of that Cyledr went mad.
(The Mabinogion, translated by Sioned Davies, p209)

There is a truth that needs to be understood about Gwyn ap Nudd, and it is not a comforting truth.

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Afagddu Arthur Ceridwen Creirwy Hanes Taliesin Morfran eil Tegid

Thoughts on Ceridwen and Afagddu

Some random thoughts that came up in meditation today:

If Creirwy is the Child, and Ceridwen is the Mother, who is the Crone to complete the triad?

In adulthood, Morfran eil Tegid is one of three to survive the battle of Camlan, because of his ugliness. He has hair on his face like a stag, it is said. I wonder… did he – did the child, Afagddu – have horns like a stag? What would it mean if he did?

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Afagddu Ceridwen Elffin Gwion Bach Gwyddno Garanhir Hanes Taliesin Taliesin

Thoughts on Ceridwen and Gwion Bach

  • The cauldron was heated for a year and a day. It distilled all wisdom into three drops: the rest of the liquid was a bitter poison.

Takeaway: wisdom does not come easily or without cost. Wisdom comes from bitter experience. Those who never suffer setbacks do not acquire wisdom. There is always a price: and sometimes that price is not always paid by the person who acquires the wisdom. We can probably all think of occasions when we hurt other people, inadvertently or  otherwise. We may have reflected upon our actions, and regretted them, immediately or later. We may well have learned from them, and become a wiser and better person for the experience. But: the other persons still got hurt, and we often can’t remedy that. The three drops contained all knowledge and all wisdom: how much hurt, and upset, would have been needed to provide that?

  • Where was Afagddu during the year and a day?

Ceridwen seems to have decided that Afagddu should receive the benefit of the cauldron, without contributing. Had he received the distilled wisdom, he would not have worked for it. Presumably, Ceridwen would have guided him and mentored him. What might he have become? And how hurt and disappointed must he have been, to see his path to acceptance and a place of honour taken by another? A question with a complex answer: why did Ceridwen not obtain another cauldron, and more herbs, and tried again? Perhaps because Llyn Tegid was poisoned, and no other water would do (why not?). His chance came, and he lost it, and neither was any doing of his. Is this a lesson that we should not shelter others or, through our love for them, stifle their opportunities to learn and do for themselves?

  • Gwion was a random beneficiary of a lot of planning and hard work that was intended for someone else. He received a great gift – and it killed him.

For all his sudden insight… he was not able to escape Ceridwen’s wrath. He had all the knowledge in the world: but it wasn’t gained from his own efforts and practice, so he was unable to apply it effectively.  He was swallowed as a seed, and that seed impregnated Ceridwen so that he was reborn – but it was Ceridwen’s love, not his knowledge, that saved him.

  • Ceridwen puts the reborn Gwion into a coracle, and sends him to the sea. He floats there (for forty years?) before returning to land.

Perhaps this is Ceridwen returning things to balance. Having borne a son, she has given him all she has to give – a sets him free to shape his own future, according to what the world sends him and where the sea takes him. He returns to the lands of Gwyddno Garanhir, whose horses were poisoned by the broken cauldron, and restores his family’s fortunes.

 

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Ceridwen Druid Journal Druidry Hanes Taliesin Tegid Foel

Tegid Foel

Tegid Foel was lord of Bala, and husband to Ceridwen.

‘Foel’ means ‘bald’, and this tells us a lot.

The first possible meaning is that it was a nickname. Nicknames are derived from something unusual or noteworthy about the person concerned. An old man being bald is neither unusual nor noteworthy; we can infer that Tegid was not old, and his baldness was unusual. This reinforces my belief that Ceridwen is no hag: she’s a woman in her prime, loving mother to two young children,  a witch-queen.

The second possible meaning comes from a Llewellyn Encyclopaedia article on Druid Vestments:

Druids were often described as bald (many had the nickname Mael—Old Irish for “bald”). The bald head was probably a Druidic tonsure, presumably the same kind of partially-shaven head used by later Irish clerics and condemned by the Roman church as non-conformist. This kind of tonsure is made by shaving the hair from ear to ear, along to the front hairline. This gives the appearance of a receding hairline or of a very high forehead. It is interesting to note that Indian Brahmans have a very similar tonsure!

Perhaps, then, this is subtly telling us that Tegid was a Druid!